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Henges Insulation & Fireplaces services in the kansas city area
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Adding Insulation

Adding insulation to an existing home can increase energy efficiency and reduce utility bills. First, you need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where.  A qualified home energy auditor, like Henges Insulation & Fireplaces, can check your insulation.

Adding insulation

In newer houses, you may be able to find out what insulation was installed from the builder. In older houses, you’ll need to request an energy audit or if you prefer to do it yourself, follow these helpful tips from the U.S. Department of Energy:

  • Inspect the attic, walls and floors adjacent to an unheated space, like a garage or basement.  See what type of insulation you have and measure its thickness.
  • Check the exterior walls using an electrical outlet:
    • Turn off the power to the outlet.
    • Remove the outlet cover and inspect the cracks to see if there is insulation.
    • Remove some of the insulation to help determine the type.
  • Tip – Just because you find insulation in one wall doesn’t mean that it’s everywhere in the house.
  • Check and measure the thickness of any insulation in unfinished basement ceilings and walls, or above crawl spaces.
  • Once you’ve determined the type of insulation you have in these areas and its thickness, check out the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the R-values of insulation previously installed in your home.

Henges Insulation & Fireplaces in Olathe, Kansas, is a leading contractor in the insulation and fireplace industries in the Kansas City area. We have provided high-quality products and services to builders, remodelers, designers, architects and homeowners since 1932.

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Prepare For Winter

Prepare for winter by adding insulation to your home. A highly trained contractor will install proper levels of insulation to keep you comfortable without high bills.
 

Installing insulation is the largest part of our business. We work with builders, commercial contractors and homeowners throughout the metro Kansas City area. As knowledge spreads in our tech-savvy world, more building or remodeling homeowners have become aware of the importance of professionally installed, quality insulation.

We welcome all insulation jobs, big or small, residential or commercial. We will evaluate your project, consult with you on your goals, help you choose  appropriate insulation, air seal your structure and install insulation with the precision and thoroughness that guarantees a job done right. We choose our products from proven manufacturers. With our extensive knowledge and experienced professionals, you will get optimum performance out of insulation installed by Henges Insulation & Fireplaces.

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Adding Insulation to an Existing Home

Adding insulation to an existing home or structure can most often increase energy efficiency and reduce utility bills. In older homes it’s a given, since most were built with less insulation than builders use today. Even in newer homes, additional insulation can usually pay itself off in energy savings within a few years.

Adding Insulation to an Existing Home

Adding Insulation to an Existing Home:

First, you need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A qualified home energy auditor, such as Greg Kudrna at Henges Insulation & Fireplaces, can check your insulation. In newer houses, you may be able to find out what insulation was installed from the builder. In older houses, you’ll need to request an energy audit or if you prefer to do it yourself, follow these helpful tips from the U.S. Department of Energy:

  • Check the attic, walls and floors adjacent to an unheated space, like a garage or basement. The structural elements are usually exposed in these areas, which makes it easy to see what type of insulation you have and to measure its depth or thickness (inches).
  • Inspect the exterior walls using an electrical outlet:
    1. Turn off the power to the outlet.
    2. Remove the outlet cover and shine a flashlight into the crack around the outlet box. You should be able to see if there is insulation in the wall and possibly how thick it is.
    3. Pull out a small amount of insulation if needed to help determine the type of insulation.
    4. Check outlets on the first and upper floors, if any, and in old and new parts of a house. Just because you find insulation in one wall doesn’t mean that it’s everywhere in the house.
  • Inspect and measure the thickness (inches) of any insulation in unfinished basement ceilings and walls, or above crawl spaces. If the crawl space isn’t ventilated, it may have insulation in the perimeter wall. If your house is relatively new, it may have been built with insulation outside the basement or foundation walls. If so, the insulation in these spaces won’t be visible. The builder or the original homeowner might be able to tell you if exterior insulation was used.
  • Once you’ve determined the type of insulation you have in these areas and its thickness (inches), see the U.S. Department of Energy’s online Insulation Fact Sheet for how to determine the R-values of insulation previously installed in your home.

If you have any questions, please give us a call at 913-764-4600. If you would like us to install your additional insulation, we’d be happy to come out and do a thorough inspection for you.

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Insulation Basics

Ever wondered how insulation works? Understanding how insulation works can help us find the right material for a particular project.
how insulation works

We found a great article on buildinggreen.com that explains the basics:

Choosing the right insulation can be confounding. No other building material comes in so many forms—from ground-up newspapers to foam boards to translucent gel. Understanding how insulation works can help us find the right material for a particular project.

The word insulation comes from the Latin insula—an island. Insulation attempts to create a climate-controlled enclosure by slowing heat flow—quite a trick, since thermal energy will always keep moving until equilibrium is reached, and your “island” of conditioned air is tiny compared with the outdoors. It gets even trickier when you consider that heat moves in three different ways: through conduction, convection, and radiation.

How Insulation Works:

Thermal conduction is the movement of heat through direct contact: one molecule, literally vibrating with thermal energy, bounces into an adjacent molecule, transferring some of that energy. If you touch a hot wood stove, your hand will rapidly gain heat through conduction. Convection, by contrast, is the movement of molecules through a fluid or gas. It transfers heat because differences in temperature tend to cause air to move, carrying its heat energy. Air is warmed by a wood stove, becomes buoyant, and moves upward through a room, spreading its energy. Radiant heat flows by way of infrared waves. You can stand several feet from a fire and feel its glow. We are heated by the sun’s radiation, 93 million miles away.

R-value measures resistance to thermal conduction; a material with a higher R-value per inch is a better insulator. Most types of insulation work because they have millions of pockets of gas trapped within their structure. These pockets slow heat transfer from high-energy, warm air molecules to low-energy air molecules on the other side of the wall. Fiber insulation, such as fiberglass and cellulose, relies on trapped air. The R-value of some foam insulation is enhanced by trapped gases: low-conductivity blowing agents. The insulation materials themselves—plastics in foams or wood fiber in cellulose—are also inherently resistant to conduction.

Insulation materials stop convection in two ways. The material itself interrupts the air movement, and the individual pockets of trapped air are small enough that air currents don’t form within them. Some insulation materials also form an effective air barrier, stopping air from flowing through the building enclosure and carrying heat (and moisture) with it.

Materials differ in their emissivity—their ability to radiate heat. Low-emissivity (low-e) coatings such as foil facings, when adjacent to an air space, help slow heat radiation from a warm object to cooler objects. Radiant barriers have a place in specialized applications, as the low-e coatings in windows and the underside of roof sheathing, but paint and insulation manufacturers are notorious for exaggerating their benefits.Choosing the right insulation can be confounding. No other building material comes in so many forms—from ground-up newspapers to foam boards to translucent gel. Understanding how insulation works can help us find the right material for a particular project.

Original article can be found here.

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